PhilaNet.com | Contact Us | Advertise



Archive for the ‘Center City’ Category

Philly End The Fed Block Party

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

September 9, 2017 at 12 PM
10 N Independence Mall W, Philadelphia, PA 19106, United States

Are you ready for the greatest grassroots liberty event of the year in PA!? Join us as we shutdown the entire block in front of the Federal Reserve building in Philadelphia, not to protest or shout, but to have fun, connect, network and enjoy ourselves as we bring more light to the issue of central banking, fiat currency, economic controls and the solution to these problems, and many others.

The event will begin at 12:00 and will feature live music, speakers on a variety of different topics, and a variety of vending booths, including food/drink. This is a permitted event with an enforced time period. The streets will have to be cleared at 4 P.M.

Bring your signs, bring your friends, bring your bag chairs, and bring your passion!

Our Speakers include:

Event MC: Dale Kerns for US Senate2018/Libertarian/Penna

Keith F Smith – Cryptocurrency entrepreneur, Developer of Nexus Cryptocurrency
http://www.nexusearth.com/

Steve Scheetz – 2018 Libertarian Candidate for Congress representing Pennsylvania’s 8th District, Former Chair of the Libertarian Party of Pennsylvania
http://buckslp.org/candidates/steve-scheetz | Steve Scheetz Candidate for Congress District 8

Dale Kerns – 2018 Libertarian Candidate for Senate representing Pennsylvania
https://www.dalekerns.com/ | Dale Kerns for US Senate2018/Libertarian/Penna

Will Coley – former Libertarian Party Vice Presidential candidate, National Director of Muslims 4 Liberty, Host of “The Call to Freedom”
http://www.muslims4liberty.org/ – http://lrn.fm/shows/

Adam Kokesh – Long time freedom activist, Iraq War veteran, Author of “Freedom!”, 2020 Libertarian Party Candidate for (Not) President.
http://thefreedomline.com/ – https://www.youtube.com/user/AdamKokesh

Philip Labonte – Vocalist for the world touring band All That Remains, outspoken Libertarian, Constitutionalist, and Gun Rights advocate.

Splash

Larry Sharpe – 2018 Libertarian Candidate for Governor of New York, Managing Director of the Neo-Sage, Instructor and guest instructor at Columbia’s Graduate School of Business and Yale University School of Management respectively. Larry is well known and well respected as being one of the best motivators and unifiers in the Libertarian Party. – Larry Sharpe for New York

Dr. Murray Sabrin – Professor of Finance in the Anisfield School of Business. He was awarded a Ph.D. in economic geography from Rutgers University, an M.A. in social studies education from Lehman College and a B.A. in history, geography and social studies education from Hunter College. Dr. Sabrin is also contributing member of the Mises Institute.
http://www.murraysabrin.com/ – https://mises.org/profile/murray-sabrin

The Philly End The Fed Block Party will also feature Live Performances featuring both original music and some of your favorite anti-establishment songs by:
Jamall Anthony – https://www.instagram.com/themallystar/?hl=en –
Corrected Axiom – https://www.facebook.com/CorrectedAxiom/
Groundwork – https://www.facebook.com/groundworkband/

March For Science

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017

by Daniel Brouse

PHILADELPHIA, PA — The March For Science protest was held in over 500 cities worldwide. The Trump administration has invented many fake news stories and alternative facts including climate change is a hoax, vaccines are dangerous and the best way to protect the environment is through economic growth.

Hundreds of thousands of scientists and science lovers came out on Earthday 2017 to support science and technology. Philadelphia’s march stretched for 14 blocks across the entire street from City Hall to Penn’s Landing.

VIDEO: March-For-Science-Philadelphia-Earthday-April-22-2017.mp4

The Human Induced Climate Change Experiment

March for Science in Philadelphia

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

Saturday, April 22 at 10 AM – 2 PM / Earth Day April 22, 2017
Penn’s Landing
101 S. Columbus Blvd., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106

PHILADELPHIA — March For Science is a nationwide protest in support of science and technology. The Trump administration has discredited scientist in many areas. President Trump has said the climate change is a hoax. The acting director of the EPA stated that carbon emissions are not causing global warming.

Join the March for Science Philadelphia on Saturday, April 22, 2017. The March for Science PHL will be held at Penn’s Landing Great Plaza. (March for Science in Philadelphia on Facebook)

They will assemble at 10:00am on the east side of City Hall (Juniper Street). The March will kick-off promptly at 11:00am and will go down Market Street to Front Street, Front Street to Chestnut Street and then over Chestnut Street to Penn’s Landing Great Plaza.

Entertainment will begin at 11:30am and the March for Science speakers will begin at 12.

Similar marches will take place throughout the country including Washington D.C. and 394 satellite marches.

“The Franklin Institute supports the March for Science, and it’s exciting to see the greater Philadelphia community come together to celebrate science. Our mission is to inspire a passion for learning about science and technology, and we provide opportunities for students, families, and adults to do that all year long. We will continue to be a resource for science education for our community, and to stand up for science, as we have done for 193 years.”

ABOUT THE MARCH FOR SCIENCE
The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest.

The March for Science is a celebration of science. It’s not about scientists or politicians; it is about the very real role that science plays in each of our lives and the need to respect and encourage research that gives us insight into the world. Nevertheless, the march has generated a great deal of conversation around whether or not scientists should involve themselves in politics. In the face of an alarming trend toward discrediting scientific consensus and restricting scientific discovery, we might ask instead: can we afford not to speak out in its defense?

People who value science have remained silent for far too long in the face of policies that ignore scientific evidence and endanger both human life and the future of our world. New policies threaten to further restrict scientists’ ability to research and communicate their findings. We face a possible future where people not only ignore scientific evidence, but seek to eliminate it entirely. Staying silent is a luxury that we can no longer afford. We must stand together and support science.

The application of science to policy is not a partisan issue. Anti-science agendas and policies have been advanced by politicians on both sides of the aisle, and they harm everyone — without exception. Science should neither serve special interests nor be rejected based on personal convictions. At its core, science is a tool for seeking answers. It can and should influence policy and guide our long-term decision-making.

The March for Science champions and defends science and scientific integrity, but it is a small step in the process toward encouraging the application of science in policy. We understand that the most effective way to protect science is to encourage the public to value and invest in it.

The best way to ensure science will influence policy is to encourage people to appreciate and engage with science. That can only happen through education, communication, and ties of mutual respect between scientists and their communities — the paths of communication must go both ways. There has too long been a divide between the scientific community and the public. We encourage scientists to reach out to their communities, sharing their research and its impact on people’s everyday lives. We encourage them, in turn, to listen to communities and consider their research and future plans from the perspective of the people they serve. We must take science out of the labs and journals and share it with the world.